The Role of Negligence in Truck Accidents

Jul 29, 2015 by

The frequency by which traffic accidents occur in America is becoming increasingly worrisome. This is particularly true for accidents involving large trucks such as 18-wheelers, big rigs, tractor trailers, and the like. According to information gathered by the Institute for Highway Safety or IIHS, the year 2013 saw 3,062 fatalities cause by crashes where a large truck is involved. The institute found that 67 percent of the victims were riding in regular passenger vehicles. 16 percent of the victims were truck drivers, and another 15 percent of the victims were bicyclists, motorcyclists, or pedestrians.

There’s no surprise as to why large truck accidents are especially dangerous for motorists and pedestrians. As the IIHS notes, these trucks are often 20 to 30 times heavier than cars. A truck can weigh in at about 80,000 pounds, while a car is only roughly around 4,000 pounds. This huge disparity also makes it difficult for drivers to control trucks. Compared to a regular car, trucks need to cover a longer distance before being able to come to a full stop. The size of the vehicle also leaves truck drivers vulnerable to more blind sports or “no-zone” areas.

Still, it’s important to note that truck accidents aren’t simply caused by these factors. While the discrepancy in size and weight heightens certain risks, it is negligence that plays a crucial role in most of the truck accidents reported in America. In most cases, truck accidents are caused by a negligent error committed by the driver or by a careless mistake made on the part of the company in-charge of operations.

According to the website Toronto personal injury lawyers, truck driver negligence can take many forms. The most usual cases of truck driver negligence include committing errors and violations such as drifting between different lanes, failing to properly signal when stopping or turning, using brakes unnecessarily or drastically, failing to yield or give way, ignoring stop lights and traffic signs, as well as speeding. On the other hand, examples of examples of negligence by trucking companies include failing to properly train newly hired employees, hiring unqualified individuals, violating hours of service regulations, and failing to maintain the vehicles in their fleet.

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The Need for Freight Factoring

Sep 24, 2014 by

Truckers know the ins and outs of trucking, and if they are newbies, they learn real fast. The really experienced truckers should do quite well when they strike out on their own and start their own trucking business, then, right? Well, not necessarily.

You see, there’s a great divide between driving a truck and driving a truck business. When you’re driving a truck and hauling freight, you are a technician concerned only with how to get where you’re going fast and delivering the goods safe and sound. You don’t have to worry about expenses like fuel, vehicle maintenance and repair, rent, utilities, office equipment and supplies, payroll, taxes, and so on. But when you’re in business for yourself, you’ll realize in a hurry that there is more to the trucking business than trucking. Unfortunately, many put all their savings and then some into the dream of becoming their own boss and realize this reality too late to pull back without losing everything.

The biggest problem for start-up trucking companies is the lapse between the job and payment. One of their earliest realizations is that with large trucking companies offering flexible payment terms to clients they can do no less in order to stay competitive. In the meantime, expenses just keep piling up, more so ironically when business is good. If they want to get more and repeat customers, they need to spend more first; the thing is where will the money come from? As pointed out on the TBS Factoring website, it is difficult to get a traditional bank loan and takes too long besides.

This is the role that freight factoring plays. It bridges the gap between the job and the payment by advancing the cash value of an invoice payable in 30 to 90 days so that the trucking company can keep afloat. It’s not a charity; freight factoring companies slice off a small piece of the pie for themselves. Overall, though, the fee is nothing compared to the cost of money of waiting for 30 to 90 days for an invoice to become due. Moreover, having the cash on hand makes it possible for the trucking company to accept more jobs and expand the business.

Freight factoring is not for everyone; certainly not for a trucking business with good cash flow. However, for the typical small trucking company, it opens up financing options that would otherwise not be available.

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