Types Of Car Seat Infants Should Use

Apr 20, 2016 by

Expecting parents often are excited to buy stuffs for the upcoming new member of the family. Baby clothing, diapers, baby strollers, and infant toys are carefully chosen by parents for their baby. Parents, however, should also carefully choose the car seat that will be used by their baby. According to the Mayo Clinic, the #1 mistake parents make when selecting car seats for their children, is to buy used car seats without properly researching that seat’s history.

Child seats in vehicles are required to protect younger children and babies in an unfortunate event of a crash. Child seat use are required because vehicle seat belts are not protect younger children during crashes. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has issued a children car seat recommendations to guide parents in buying car seats. New born babies until the age of three are only required to ride in a vehicle with a rear-facing car seat. Children who have already exceeded the size limitations of rear-facing car seats may use forward-facing car seats until approximately reaching the age of seven. Booster seats on the other hand are required to children whose maximum age is 12 years old. Booster seats are used to firmly secure a child while restrained by a regular seat belt. Children whose age is 12 years and older may no longer use car seats as they can be restrained by seat belts. Car seats often come in different designs depending on the child’s age and built. Parents may want to check the NHTSA official website if they want to know more information about child car seats.

According to the website of the Spiros Champaign Law Firm, it is important for parents to carefully choose the right car seat that should be used by their children to protected them from serious injuries caused by other vehicles. Children are left seriously or fatally injured when they got involved in car accidents. Parents unfortunately often have to deal with expensive hospitalizations when their younger loved ones are injured in such accidents.

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The Role of Negligence in Truck Accidents

Jul 29, 2015 by

The frequency by which traffic accidents occur in America is becoming increasingly worrisome. This is particularly true for accidents involving large trucks such as 18-wheelers, big rigs, tractor trailers, and the like. According to information gathered by the Institute for Highway Safety or IIHS, the year 2013 saw 3,062 fatalities cause by crashes where a large truck is involved. The institute found that 67 percent of the victims were riding in regular passenger vehicles. 16 percent of the victims were truck drivers, and another 15 percent of the victims were bicyclists, motorcyclists, or pedestrians.

There’s no surprise as to why large truck accidents are especially dangerous for motorists and pedestrians. As the IIHS notes, these trucks are often 20 to 30 times heavier than cars. A truck can weigh in at about 80,000 pounds, while a car is only roughly around 4,000 pounds. This huge disparity also makes it difficult for drivers to control trucks. Compared to a regular car, trucks need to cover a longer distance before being able to come to a full stop. The size of the vehicle also leaves truck drivers vulnerable to more blind sports or “no-zone” areas.

Still, it’s important to note that truck accidents aren’t simply caused by these factors. While the discrepancy in size and weight heightens certain risks, it is negligence that plays a crucial role in most of the truck accidents reported in America. In most cases, truck accidents are caused by a negligent error committed by the driver or by a careless mistake made on the part of the company in-charge of operations.

According to the website Toronto personal injury lawyers, truck driver negligence can take many forms. The most usual cases of truck driver negligence include committing errors and violations such as drifting between different lanes, failing to properly signal when stopping or turning, using brakes unnecessarily or drastically, failing to yield or give way, ignoring stop lights and traffic signs, as well as speeding. On the other hand, examples of examples of negligence by trucking companies include failing to properly train newly hired employees, hiring unqualified individuals, violating hours of service regulations, and failing to maintain the vehicles in their fleet.

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Dangers of Speeding

May 2, 2015 by

Millions of Americans are injured in car accidents due to speeding every year. The injuries from these accidents range from minor scrapes to death. The financial damage from these reckless driving incidents results in billions of dollars in repairs to property and medical expenses. Speeders who are caught have to pay fines. Those who are not stopped and go on to harm innocent people end up costing society much more.

Speeding is defined as exceeding the designated speed limit on a public road or driving faster that conditions allow. The act of speeding affects the driver’s ability to control the vehicle, creating an unsafe situation for the vehicle operator and the bystanders in the area. The driver may be unable to stop quickly, navigate turns along the road, or react to the driving of other drivers sharing the road.

Around 30 percent of vehicle accidents are an outcome of speeding. Speeding increases the severity of damage when a collision occurs. For every 10 miles over the speed of 50 mph, the impact force of the colliding vehicles doubles. As the crash force increases, so does the likelihood of serious injury or death.

Drivers choose to speed for a number of reasons. They could be in a rush, not paying attention, not believe their driving is dangerous, or under the misconception that the law does not apply to them. While any one could be at fault for speeding, the risk is more prominent in young men. As age increases, the likelihood of speeding or being involved in a fatal speeding accident decreases.

According to Memphis auto accident lawyers, the financial damage to a person or property in speeding accidents can be substantial. The physical damages sustained in an accident may require expensive medical bills or leave from work to recover. The emotional damages after being involved in a frightening accident can also be severe. If you or a loved one was involved in an accident due to a driver that was speeding, contact a personal injury attorney in your area to inquire about compensation for the injuries you suffered.

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The Consequences of Not Wearing a Seatbelt

Feb 26, 2015 by

Car accidents are traumatic experiences with risks to severe injuries if the involved drivers and their passengers (if there are any) are not wearing a seat belt. The use of seat belt is a mandate in the US, previously a federal law that was passed on January 1, 1968. This law was intended to lessen occasions of injuries or deaths, a natural phenomenon during vehicular accidents.

The Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) mentions two divisions of the seat belt law: primary, wherein traffic enforcers are authorized to issue a ticket to a driver if he/she and/or his/her passenger are/is unbuckled while driving (even with the absence of any other traffic violation), and secondary, which necessitates another citable traffic offense for an enforcement officer to ticket a driver in the event that he/she and/or a passenger are/is unbuckled.

Though originally a federal rule, the stipulations of the seat belt law is now dependent on the state that is particularly enforcing it. Other than the driver, the law also considers the age of the passenger and the specific seat where he/she is seated. Those seating at the backseat are usually not required to buckle up (after reaching a certain age. Children below the age of 7 should be protected by a seat belt all the time. There is a separate law with regard to seat belt requirements for infants and toddlers).

A seat belt, like any other car part, should be without any defect. To ensure this, the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, which took effect in December of 1998, requires the crashworthiness of seat belt assemblies. This is because a defective or poorly-manufactured seat belt (such as a seat belt buckle loosening by itself, release buttons failing to work properly, or the belt itself tearing easily) may just prove to be more harmful to its user than ensuring safety during vehicle collisions.

No amount of safety can be equaled by a seat belt that works properly and effectively. According to the website of Abel Law, if the seat belt is found defective and as the cause of injury, then the victim may have the legal right to claim compensation from the manufacturer of the defective part.

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